US court prevents Dr Reddy’s from launching opioid treatment drug Suboxone

Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories hopes of resuming sales of its generic version of British drugmaker Indivior’s Suboxone in the U.S. were dashed when a court there restrained it pending outcome in a litigation over the patent of the opioid dependence treatment drug. A development that is bound to turn the spotlight on Dr. Reddy’s scrip when markets re-open on Monday, the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey has granted a preliminary injunction against the Hyderabad-headquartered firm. Announcing grant of the PI, a July 13 statement issued by Indivior said with it restrictions of the previous temporary restraining order (TRO) remain. DRL would be “unable to sell, offer to sell, or import its generic buprenorphine/naloxone sublingual film product, pending the outcome of recently filed litigation against DRL related to US Patent No. 9,931,305 or a decision of the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit dissolving the injunction.” Indivior CEO Shaun Thaxter said “as a result of today’s court ruling, Dr.Reddy’s is prevented from re-launching its generic product until the patent litigation related to the ‘305 patent is concluded or until DRL prevails on an appeal of this injunction. While we do not know the timing for these events, we will continue to vigorously defend our intellectual property.” Responding to the development, Dr.Reddy’s Laboratories on Saturday said “the company disagrees with the court’s decision and will vigorously appeal it.” The company said in intended to appeal the decision made by the US District Court in a PI hearing with respect to further sales and commercialisation of Dr.…
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Birth certificate can’t be seen as nativity: Madras High Court

Holding that by no stretch of imagination can a birth certificate be construed as a nativity certificate, the Madras High Court has rejected a plea from an MBBS aspirant to direct the State Selection Committee to select him to the course. M Goutham was born at Karur on June 5, 2000 and belongs to the Kongu Vellalar, a backward class, community. He completed Class 10 at Kottayam and Class 12 in 2017. He secured 424/720 marks in NEET, but was not included in the rank list and is not aware of his rank. Justice S Vaidyanathan pointed out that the petitioner had not only selected the State of Kerala as his examination centre, but had also mentioned his address as being in Kerala. The birth certificate can by no stretch of imagination be construed as the nativity certificate. Even though the petitioner had mentioned in the confirmation page that the State to which he belongs to is Tamil Nadu, as he has not satisfied Clause 3 of the Prospectus issued by TN for admission to medical courses, he would not be entitled to relief, the court said. “If we read the Prospectus, more particularly Clause 3(f), in the present case on hand, the nativity cannot be construed as the place of birth.…
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U.S. accuses Russia of stifling press freedom after court fines radio

The U.S. State Department accused Moscow of stifling press freedom and media independence on Friday after a Russian court fined the U.S. government-sponsored Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty for violating Russia’s “foreign agent” law. RFE/RL said the court found it guilty on Thursday of not complying fully with Moscow’s foreign agent law and fined it 100,000 roubles ($1,585), which the broadcaster described as the latest step in a campaign against its operations. “The Russian government continues to stifle press freedom and media independence,” State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said in a statement. “We condemn the selective targeting of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty and Voice of America under Russia’s law on ‘foreign agent’ media outlets.” Russia designated RFE/RL and Voice of America as foreign agents in December. The decision required the outlets to include in any information they publish or broadcast to Russian audiences a statement mentioning their status as foreign agents. The Russian designation was seen as retaliation for what Moscow said was unacceptable U.S. pressure on Russian media in the United States. U.S. intelligence officials have accused the Kremlin of using Russian media it finances to influence U.S. voters. Washington last year forced Russian state broadcaster RT to register its U.S.-based affiliate as a foreign agent under U.S.…
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Facebook reveals special data-sharing deals to Congress

Facebook shared user information with dozens of hardware and software makers, as well as application developers, well after it said it cut off outside companies’ access to the data in 2015. The set-ups were described in 747 pages of documents submitted to the House Energy and Commerce Committee late Friday evening in response to hundreds of questions lawmakers had asked company executives. The disclosures come amid widening scrutiny of how well Facebook protects the personal information of the network’s users and their friends. The social networking giant said it made the special arrangements so hardware and software makers could ensure Facebook worked on their devices and operating systems, and application developers had time to comply with the company’s stricter access policies. All told, 52 hardware and software makers — including Apple, Blackberry, Amazon and Microsoft – had access to the data. But the list also includes Chinese firms such as Huawei and Alibaba, some of which gave generated national security concerns. Facebook said it has ended 38 of the 52 partnerships. It said it will shut down an additional seven by the end of July and another one by the end of October. Among the handful that will continue beyond that are those with Amazon, Apple and Alibaba.…
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FACEBOOK WON’T USE TECH IN PATENT THAT TURNS PHONE MICS ON

In an attempt to assuage concerns raised by Facebook’s filing for a patent for software that could turn the mics of smartphones on in order to record secret messages in TV ads, the social networking giant has ruled out using the technology in any of its products. The patent had been filed “to prevent aggression from other companies,” Facebook Vice President and Deputy General Counsel Allen Lo told Engadget in a statement this week. The technology in this patent has not been included in any of Facebook’s products, “and never will be”, Lo said. According to a report in Metro, the controversial software patent Facebook had applied for consists of a system which lets it quietly tell people’s smartphones to capture “ambient audio”. The technology is designed to monitor what people watch on their “broadcasting device” so that the adverts they are shown on Facebook are likely to appeal to them, and give companies an accurate sense of the size of the audience which has viewed their promotion. While the invasive nature of the technology has raised eyebrows for its potential to violate privacy, Facebook said it had no intention of implementing the technology described in the patent. (Credit: IANS)…
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After subpoenaing Apple in trade secrets case, Tesla goes after Facebook

In an ongoing high-stakes lawsuit, Tesla has now asked a judge for emergency permission to serve subpoenas on numerous tech firms, including Facebook and Dropbox. Tesla believes these companies hold data connected to a recently fired technician that the auto company says stole its trade secrets. US Magistrate Judge Valerie P. Cooke in Nevada had already granted Tesla permission on Monday to serve Microsoft, Google, and Apple with similar subpoenas in the case filed against Martin Tripp, whom CEO Elon Musk has suggested is a saboteur. Tripp previously worked at the Gigafactory in Sparks, Nevada, which manufactures Tesla’s batteries. The former employee insists that he is a whistleblower. He has previously told Ars that he witnessed large quantities of waste and that “punctured” cells as part of batteries were allowed to ship. For its part, Tesla has strongly denied that any such damaged batteries made it into any Model 3. The company said in a statement that “Tripp is either not telling the truth or he simply has no idea what he is talking about.” Musk has previously said publicly that Tripp is among a group of “bad apples” who are trying to thwart the company’s efforts to rapidly ramp up production of the Model 3.…
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“Inventor of email” appeals ruling that tossed his libel suit against Techdirt

Lawyers representing the Massachusetts man who for years has made a highly-controversial claim that he invented email have filed their appeal in an ongoing lawsuit brought against the tech news site, Techdirt. The appeal to the 1st US Circuit Court of Appeals comes more than a year after a federal judge dismissed the libel lawsuit brought by Shiva Ayyadurai, an entrepreneur who is now also running as a longshot candidate for the United States Senate. In the lower court ruling, US District Judge F. Dennis Saylor found that because it is impossible to define precisely and specifically what email is, Ayyadurai’s “claim is incapable of being proved true or false.” In Ayyadurai’s lawyers’ Thursday filing, they argued Techdirt previously published articles and comments that contained numerous antagonistic words used to describe Ayyadurai—a “fraud,” a “charlatan,” a “liar,” a “fake”—that a “reasonable reader” would find as asserting a factual statement rather than a protected opinion. Because of this, Ayyadurai’s team believes, Techdirt’s work can constitute defamation. The appeal also argues that because Techdirt disregarded “extensive factual evidence,” the publication “consciously disregarded” the truth and knowingly acted with “actual malice.” Based on that, Ayyadurai and his attorneys claim, the case should be allowed to go forward.…
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SEC, Testing Power, Wants More Discretion to Set Whistleblower Awards

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday proposed giving the agency’s top officials broader authority to set whistleblower awards, including added power to cut the largest bounties and boost those deemed too low. SEC Chairman Jay Clayton said the formula used to determine awards has proved “too rigid.” Under the SEC’s whistleblower program, which was created by the Dodd-Frank financial reforms, tipsters can receive between 10 percent and 30 percent of monetary sanctions from the agency’s enforcement actions. Whistleblowers involved in the SEC’s most significant enforcement actions would still be in line for immense wealth under the proposal advanced Thursday, but commissioners would have added discretion to dock bounties on the basis of their sheer size. The SEC voted 3-2 to push the proposal out for public comment, with the two Democratic commissioners dissenting over concerns that the changes would undercut the whistleblower program and bring improper considerations into future award decisions. In cases involving $100 million or more in monetary sanctions, Clayton said the proposal would allow commissioners to reduce whistleblower bounties so that they do not exceed what is “reasonably necessary” to reward the tipster and incentivize future reporting to the SEC. Awards in those cases could not be adjusted below a still-whopping sum: $30 million.…
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California passes consumer protection, online privacy law

California lawmakers passed and Governor Jerry Brown signed the California Consumer Privacy Act Thursday, granting broad online privacy protections to consumers. Assembly member and bill sponsor Ed Chau said in a statement, “Today, California took a historic step in enacting legislation to protect children and consumers by giving them control over their own personal data. Consumers should have a right to choose how their personal information is collected and used by businesses. It is your data, your privacy, your choice.” Starting January 1, 2020, the law grants consumers the right to, among other things: Ask a business to disclose the categories and specific pieces of personal information that it collects about the consumer, the purposes for doing so, and any third parties the information is shared with; Request deletion of personal information; and Opt out of the sale of personal information with penalty The law requires companies to make disclosures about the information they collect and the purposes for which it is used. It also authorizes businesses to offer financial incentives in exchange for the collection of personal information. The law was introduced last week in an effort to defeat a stricter ballot initiative that had been set for November. Because it passed, the November ballot initiative will be removed.…
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US Department of Justice approves Disney-Fox Deal

On June 27, the U.S. Department of Justice approved Walt Disney’s partial merger with 21st Century Fox, but said Disney must sell Fox’s regional sports networks as those, coupled with ESPN, could form a monopoly in sports broadcasting. Disney, which agreed to the DOJ’s stipulation, will pay $38 per share in cash and stock for most of the assets of Fox for a total consideration of about $71.3 billion, though Comcast is not out of the running quite yet as it could still top Disney’s offer. Shares of Fox rose 2 percent on the news to $48.59 giving Rupert Murdoch’s company a market capitalization of $89.6 billion, meaning that Wall Street values the portion Disney will not be purchasing at $18.3 billion. Those assets, which include the Fox News Channel, Fox Business Network, the Fox broadcast network, FS1 and FS2, are, for now, called New Fox. The portion of the company that Disney — and Comcast — are trying to purchase include the TV and movie studio, Star India, FX, Nat Geo, Fox’s 30 percent share of Hulu and Fox’s 39 percent stake in Sky, the European satellite TV company. Disney had already signaled in an SEC filing it might be willing to sell Fox’s 22 RSNs, which generate roughly $1 billion in annual adjusted earnings, should regulators balk at combining those with ESPN, the nation’s dominant sports network with 88 million subscribers.…
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‘Historic’ data-privacy bill approved by California lawmakers

On June 28, California Governor Jerry Brown signed data privacy legislation aimed at giving consumers more control over how companies collect and manage their personal information, a proposal that Google and other big companies had opposed as too burdensome. Under the proposal, large companies, such as those with data on more than 50,000 people, would be required starting in 2020 to let consumers view the data they have collected on them, request deletion of data, and opt out of having the data sold to third parties. Companies must provide equal service to consumers who exercise such rights under the law. Each violation would carry a $7,500 fine. The law applies to users in California. “This is a huge step forward for California,” State Senator Bob Hertzberg, a Democrat, said during a live-streamed press conference. “This is a huge step forward for people across the country.” Brown signed the measure hours after it unanimously passed the two houses of the legislature as part of an effort to stop a similar measure from reaching the state’s November election ballot. Laws originating in the legislature instead of from ballot initiatives are easier to amend if issues arise, and even opponents in the business community characterized the legislature’s version as the lesser of two evils.…
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Trump’s travel ban upheld in the US SC

On June 26, handing Donald Trump one of the biggest victories of his presidency, the U.S. Supreme Court, upheld his travel ban thereby targeting several Muslim-majority countries. The court also found that plaintiffs challenging the proclamation were unlikely to succeed on their claim that the ban violated the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment. The ruling was 5-4 along partisan lines, with Chief Justice John Roberts writing for the conservative majority. He concluded that string of remarkable comments and warnings from Trump about Muslims did not diminish the President’s vast powers to control entry into this country. To this, the President reacted on Twitter by tweeting, “SUPREME COURT UPHOLDS TRUMP TRAVEL BAN. Wow!” Justices Anthony Kennedy and Clarence Thomas filed concurring opinions. Justice Stephen Breyer filed a dissent, joined by Justice Elena Kagan. Justice Sonia Sotomayor also filed a dissent, joined by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The ruling affirmed broad presidential discretion over who is allowed to enter the United States. It means that the current ban can remain in effect and that Trump could potentially add more countries. Trump has said the policy is needed to protect the country against attacks by Islamic militants.…
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